Articles Posted in Class Action

by
Plaintiff filed a putative class action against Defendant, a former employee of the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), alleging that Defendant accessed Driver and Vehicle Services records without authorization in violation of the federal Driver’s Privacy Protection Act (DPPA). DHS denied Defendant’s request for defense and indemnification, concluding that Defendant’s actions were outside the scope of his employment. Defendant filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the court of appeals seeking judicial review of DHS’s decision. The court of appeals remanded the matter to DHS with instructions to grant Defendant’s request, concluding that DHS’s decision was not supported by substantial evidence. The Supreme Court vacated the decision of the court of appeals, holding that the court of appeals did not have jurisdiction over Defendant’s petition for a writ of certiorari and therefore did not have authority to hear this appeal. View "Nelson v. Schlener" on Justia Law

by
Appellants, approximately 750 employees, brought a class action against their employers (Employers), alleging five causes of action, including unlawful deductions made in violation of Minn. Stat. 181.79. The jury found Employers did not violate section 181.79. After the verdict, Appellants unsuccessfully requested judgment as a matter of law (JMOL) on their section 181.79 claim. The Supreme Court reversed, holding that Appellants were entitled to JMOL on their claim under section 181.79, as there was no legally sufficient basis for a reasonable jury to find that Employers did not make unlawful deductions from Appellants' wages in violation of section 181.79. Remanded with instructions to enter JMOL in favor of Appellants on liability for their section 181.79 claim.View "Karl v. Uptown Drink, LLC" on Justia Law

by
Respondents brought this action on behalf of themselves and others similarly situated against Philip Morris, alleging that Philip Morris's marketing of its cigarettes violated Minnesota's consumer protection statutes. Respondents asserted claims under Minn. Stat. 8.31(3a) and for common law fraud and unjust enrichment. The district court granted Respondents' motion to certify the class. Subsequently, the court granted summary judgment to Philip Morris on the consumer protection claims asserted under section 8.31(3a) and then dismissed the case. The court of appeals affirmed the class certification but reversed the grant of summary judgment and reinstated Respondents' section 8.31(3a) consumer protection claims. The Supreme Court reversed, holding (1) Respondents' consumer protection claims asserted under section 8.31(3a) were previously released; and (2) because all of Respondents' claims had been dismissed, the issue of whether the plaintiff class was properly certified was moot. View "Curtis v. Altria Group, Inc." on Justia Law